PSAC Launches Online Member Survey

PSAC-Survey-graphic

The Public Service Alliance of Canada launches an online membership poll

PSAC will soon be conducting an important poll of the membership as part of its ongoing process to ensure that your voices are heard and that your priorities are reflected in the work of our union.  Members of the Yukon Employees’ Union are component members of the PSAC and may be contacted to participate.

Environics Research Group, a well-known and respected polling firm, will be conducting the online survey for PSAC, asking questions about union priorities.

Here are some things you should know about the survey:

  • The survey will be sent by email to members whose email is up to date in our database as as of January 20, 2015.
  • A random sample of members from all of our union’s bargaining units will be contacted.
  • Members who are contacted may accept or decline to participate in the survey.
  • The survey will take approximately 15 minutes to complete.
  • Individual information collected through the survey is confidential.  Also, responses are anonymous – at no time will the opinions of individual members be identified.

If you receive an email to participate in the survey, we hope you’ll click yes. Your opinions are important!


Sondage électronique des membres de l’AFPC

 L’AFPC réalisera bientôt un sondage de grande envergure auprès de ses membres. Vous aurez ainsi l’occasion de vous exprimer puisque le travail de votre syndicat doit être le reflet de vos priorités.

Environics Research Group, une maison de sondage bien connue et respectée, sera chargée du sondage électronique.

Points à retenir au sujet du sondage

  • Le questionnaire sera envoyé par courriel aux membres dont l’adresse courriel se trouve dans la base de données syndicale le 20 janvier 2015.
  • On communiquera avec un échantillon de membres de toutes les unités de négociation.
  • Si l’on communique avec vous, vous êtes libre de refuser de participer.
  • Le sondage devrait prendre environ 15 minutes.
  • Les données personnelles recueillies dans le cadre du sondage sont strictement confidentielles. Vos réponses et opinions demeurent anonymes.

Si vous recevez un courriel vous demandant de participer au sondage, nous espérons que vous accepterez. Votre opinion est importante!

Feeding My Family: Boycott North West Company

NWC 3Yukon Employees’ Union is sharing this post on behalf of our brothers & sisters in northern communities. It’s impossible to comprehend grocery prices such as those shown here. We hope you will join the growing chorus of support and take action to change this punishing reality. It is the responsibility of the North West Company to pass on the savings provided through the federal government’s Nutrition North program. Feeding My Family is a public Facebook group started by Nunavut resident Leesee Papatsie.  Visit the group’s informative website at http://feedingmyfamily.org/


Feeding My Family Boycott on North West Company Saturday January 31, 2015

Feeding My Family would like your help in boycotting North West Company (NWC) owned retailers and service providers located in Nunavut, Northwest Territories, Yukon, Alaska and southern Canada. We are asking you not to shop in any North West Company stores or use any of their service providers on Saturday January 31, 2015. Retailers owned by North West Company are; NorthMart, Northern, Giant Tiger, Quickstop, Valu Lots, Solo Market, Price Chopper, Cost-U-Less and Alaskan Commercial (AC) Value Stores. Wholesale and Services include: We Financial and Crescent Multi Food. Feeding My Family is about raising awareness of the high cost of food in the northern regions. When Minute Maid concentrated orange juice is selling for $5.15, you know something is wrong with this picture. There are lots of northerners who are unable to feed themselves and their families due to the high cost of food in the north. We have heard a lot of mothers who are not eating so their children will eat and how 70% of people in Nunavut have experienced hunger at one time or another. There are some northerners that live meal to meal, or if they are lucky, they will have a meal that day. Some families resort to food that are stomach fillers (pasta, rice, hamburger meat – the cheapest meat) to have food in their stomachs, forget nutritional food because they do not have a lot to eat that day. Please help us raise awareness of the high cost of food in the north! Tell your family, friends and others.  Write to your MP about what is happening in the north. If each one of you refuses to shop at any of the NWC’s stores on Saturday January 31, 2015 you will be helping us beat the high cost of food in the north. If even 50 people refuse to shop at each store, we will make a significant financial impact!  Each and every one of us can make a difference, every little bit helps. Stand with us and help us make a difference because we can. We HAVE to!


What can you do?

  1.  BOYCOTT! January 31st is a good day to BEGIN, but it doesn’t have to end there.
  2. Visit http://feedingmyfamily.org/ to learn more about the issues northern families face. Great answers to your questions about the opportunities and challenges, lifestyle and more. Use their contact form to ask questions.
  3. Write your MP!
  4. Join or START a community action group. They have sprung up all over the country in response to THIS Huffington Post Article and one woman’s determination.
  5. Email those in control of the North West Company. Decision makers need to know how you feel.
  6. VOTE October 19th, 2015. Choose a government that considers the needs of its people FIRST.

In case you wish to communicate your concerns directly, here are email contacts for the President & CFO of the North West Company. They are the main food retailer in Canada’s northern communities. You can also read their 3rd quarter financial report to shareholders (dividends paid, sales up!) at the link below. Edward Kennedy, President and CEO, The North West Company Inc. Phone 204-934-1482; fax 204-934-1317; email ekennedy@northwest.ca John King, Chief Financial Officer, The North West Company Inc. Phone 204-934-1397; fax 204-934-1317; email jking@northwest.ca This information is publicly available on the web, for anyone wondering about the “fairness” of sharing the email addresses. Let them know what you think about their profits on the backs of northern families.

Domestic Violence at Work | Canadian Labour Congress

Domestic Violence at Work | Canadian Labour Congress.

initial findings on domestic violence survey

Canadian employers lose $77.9 million annually due to the direct and indirect impacts of domestic violence, and the costs, to individuals, families and society, go far beyond that. However, we know very little about the scope and impacts of this problem in Canada.

The Canadian Labour Congress partnered with researchers at the University of Western Ontario and conducted the first ever Canadian survey on domestic violence in the workplace. We did this because there is almost no data on this issue in Canada and we know that women with a history of domestic violence have a more disrupted work history, are consequently on lower personal incomes, have had to change jobs more often, and more often work in casual and part time roles than women without violence experiences.

Being a perpetrator of domestic violence also significantly impacts a worker and their workplace. A recent study found that 53% of offenders felt their job performance was negatively impacted, 75% had a hard time concentrating on their work, and 19% reported causing or nearly causing workplace accidents due to their violent relationship. Their behaviours lead to a loss of paid and unpaid work time, a decrease in productivity, and safety hazards for their co-workers.

Here are some of the things we learned from this survey:

Experiences of Domestic Violence

prevalence and gender

A third (33.6%) of respondents reported ever experiencing domestic violence from an intimate partner, and there were differences by gender (figure 2).

Aboriginal respondents, respondents with disabilities, and those indicating a sexual orientation other than heterosexual (e.g., lesbian, gay or bisexual) were particularly likely to have reported experiencing DV in their lifetime. In terms of indirect domestic violence experience, 35.4% of respondents reported having at least one co-worker who they believe is experiencing, or has previously experienced, domestic violence and 11.8% reported having at least one co-worker who they believe is being abusive, or has previously been abusive, toward his/her partner.

The Impact of DV on Workers and Workplaces

DV in the workplace

Of those who reported DV experience, 38% indicated it impacted their ability to get to work (including being late, missing work, or both).

In total, 8.5% of DV victims indicated they had lost their job because of it.  

Over half (53.5%) of those reporting DV experiences indicated that at least one type of abusive act occurred at or near the workplace. Of these, the most common were abusive phone calls or text messages (40.6%) and stalking or harassment near the workplace (20.5%; Figure 3).

Ultimately, stronger evidence will help to shape legislation, policies, and practices that promote violence prevention and safety in workplaces, that hold abusers accountable for their behaviour, and that lift the burden from victims so they need not deal with domestic violence alone.

Disclosure of DV in the Workplace and Support Received

Overall, 43.2% of those experiencing DV reported they discussed it with someone at work. There are apparent differences according to gender, with men being particularly unlikely to discuss domestic violence at work.  Among all respondents, 28% said they had received information about domestic disclosure of dv in the workplace

violence from their employer. Among unionized respondents, 27.2% received information about domestic violence from their union.

Only 10.6% of all respondents think that employers are aware when domestic violence is affecting their workers, but among those who said yes, 62.3% believe employers act in a positive way to help workers experiencing domestic violence. Similarly, only 11.3% of all respondents think union officials are aware when domestic violence is affecting members, and among them, 86.6% believe unions act in a positive way to help members.

Where do we go from here?

This research has identified the scope and impact of domestic violence on workers and workplaces, but is only a first step. Immediate next steps include encouraging use of these results by governments, unions and employers to establish proactive practices to address the impact of domestic violence at work. Some immediate changes in the labour movement include:

The Yukon Teachers’ Association has negotiated special leave that can be used when workers need time off due to domestic violence.

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) has a network of social stewards who are provided training to develop listening skills, learn about available resources, and assist in prevention of a range of difficulties, including family-related problems. The program is particularly effective in Quebec.

Download the entire report and learn more about what we are doing on this issue.

Employment Insurance in Canada; Hitting Rock Bottom

To mark the first contributions made to the unemployment insurance fund more than 73 years ago (July 1, 1941), the Public Service Alliance of Canada launched today “Employment Insurance in Canada: Hitting Rock Bottom”, a short animated video on the decline of the EI program over the last 25 years. Please share!

Share the video and find out more at http://weareallaffected.ca and http://notothecuts.ca

High-functioning Autism creates challenges for the public sector.

CBC Reporter Julie Ireton’s report on the autism spectrum in the workforce. This interesting article highlights the challenges faced both by workers impacted with ASD and the challenges of creating work spaces best suited to their needs and skills.

Accommodation and understanding will go a long way toward ensuring workplace diversity reflects the strengths of all workers. The question of whether self identification will empower or hamstring workers is worthy of further discussion.

Suzanne Ford consults with Jordan Edwards about better awareness for Asperger's Syndrome in the federal workplace. (CBC)

Suzanne Ford consults with Jordan Edwards about better awareness for Asperger’s Syndrome in the federal workplace. (CBC)