The YG Fact-Finding Meeting; What to Expect

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It’s another day at work, everything seems to be going well and it’s shaping up to be a good day.  Then it happens; you receive a request to attend a meeting the following day and your supervisor advises that you are entitled to bring a union representative to the meeting!

What has happened? Why won’t they tell me what the meeting is about? What are the specifics? Aside from being frustrated that you can’t have these questions answered, being called to a meeting relatively blind is also incredibly stressful.

You have been called to a fact finding meeting.

Fact finding meetings are a very common and normal occurrence in Yukon Government workplaces.  When a supervisor or manager receives a complaint or incident report involving a staff member, they are required to investigate – this means they need to talk to you and get your version of the incident or event. If you have been asked to such a meeting, you must attend.

The fact finding meeting is based on the premise that there has been a problematic event or incident of some kind. The employer needs to ask questions to determine what happened. You might not be directly involved; you may have witnessed the incident or have information that may help to make the situation clear.

These sessions are not meant to be punitive, but should offer space for an open and honest dialogue on the event being discussed. These conversations can feel incredibly stressful for the employee and may feel like a cross examination, but that is not the intent. Your union representative will be there with you to protect your rights.

Why do I need a union representative?  It is incumbent on the employer to advise an employee of the need for representation if there’s any chance of discipline down the road.  Discipline is not always involved, but the employer cannot deny a member representation then dole out discipline after the fact; this goes against the principles of the Collective Agreement as well as the principles of natural justice.

Why won’t they answer my questions about the event or incident before the meeting?  Well, this is twofold; while they may state “we are going to be discussing event ABC” they cannot discuss the actual event outside the meeting. Firstly the employer would like to see unchecked, honest reactions to the questions posed.  Secondly if the employer engages in this conversation it may be construed as part of the fact finding session when the employee has not yet had an opportunity to secure union representation.

These meetings are usually less than an hour long, depending on the events and issues at hand.  During these sessions the employee, the employer or the union representative can ask for a break to have discussions or sidebar chats.  These meeting should be, and for the most part are, very respectful and smooth.

What can I say? What can’t I say during these sessions?  The intent of these fact findings is to bring the facts to light.  The employee is responsible to be open, honest and accountable. Your union representative is there to protect your rights and ensure proper process is followed, but they are not defense attorneys and will not be using legal gamesmanship to avoid the issues at hand.

This is a meeting about FACTS, not about what you may think of a situation. Avoid deflecting accountability by drawing others’ poor behavior into the conversation.  The employer may ask what others thought or said, but you should avoid commenting on how you believe others may think or feel about the incident or parties involved.

Do I get to have my say in the meeting? Of course – this is not a one sided barrage or cross examination.  During the meeting you will be asked several times if there is anything else you would like to add. This is the time where pertinent items to the event can be offered if they have not been addressed in the questioning.  This however is not the time to deflect accountability, point out others’ poor behavior or inject supposition or rumor into the meeting.  Your additions should be factual, pertinent and meaningful.

It is also likely that the employer will have investigated the issue by chatting with other employees named in the event.  These sessions are confidential and private, and employees are advised not to speak about these meetings outside of the HR/union/supervisory pathways.

How do I get Union representation?  Call 867-667-2331 as soon as you’ve been notified of the meeting, and ask for the intake officer.  They will ask you for the meeting time & location and ask whether have any idea what the meeting may involve.

Once this information is collected, YEU will make a call to the Shop Steward group to see who is available to attend your meeting.  Once the Shop Steward has confirmed their availability, the Steward will contact you to discuss the process and answer your questions prior to the meeting. Some Stewards will contact you well ahead of time while others, depending on time of notification, may make arrangements to speak with you just prior to the meeting.

What can I expect once the meeting is over? Timelines are usually established at the end of the meeting.  Your supervisor or the HR Representative will notify you of the timeline and might advise you that another meeting will be requested if more questions arise during their follow up.  Generally, the post-meeting fact finding time is one to two weeks.

What will happen to me? This depends on the incident and your role in what transpired.  One possible pathway is the performance management stream, another is discipline.  I will cover these topics in an upcoming performance management and discipline article on the blog; keep an eye out and have a read.

Remember, fact finding meetings are a normal part of any workplace and your YEU representatives are there to support you through these meetings.Rob-Jones-Y010-President-2016

In Solidarity,

Rob Jones

President – Local Y010

 

Greetings from YEU Local Y010 President Rob Jones

Greetings Brothers & Sisters, Friends & Colleagues.exec-adjusted

It is a great honour for me to be able to write to you as the new President of Local Y010. I am humbled to have been nominated and trusted to continue the great work of our past President and Executive.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Sister Tammi Sikorski for all her hard work, sacrifice and dedication to the local. This was greatly appreciated and I clearly have a high standard to meet in keeping up with Tammi’s leadership over these past few years.  Thank you Tammi, we owe you more than we can ever possibly convey.

I would also like to thank Brother Richard Wagner for his work and representation for the Local and YEU as a whole as our Chief Shop Steward.  His knowledge, mentorship and representation were greatly appreciated.

We also say goodbye to Sisters Kat Traplin and Yoshiko Atkins, their voice, experience and dedication to the Local were greatly appreciated and will be missed. Thank you for your service. We wish you all the best in the future.

Please allow me to introduce your Local Y010 Executive:

President: Rob Jones
Chief Shop Steward: Paul Davis
Assistant Chief Shop Steward: Laurie Tamminen
Secretary / Treasurer: Denise Berken
Directors:  Duane Purych, Khusru Zaman, Aziz Mollah
Kathy Donnelly, Amber Harder and Danielle Swift.

We have two Director vacancies. If you are interested in being an active voice in your Local please contact me to discuss the roles and responsibilities of a Local Director.

Over the next year local Y010 has an ambitious agenda including:
Y010 new logo 2014
Signing off all RAND members:
A RAND is a worker in the union environment who has not filled out a union card; presently Y010 has some RANDs.  As a RAND your union dues are being deducted, however you do not have all the benefits of full membership.  We will be working in the community and workplaces to ensue our members are converted from RAND to fully signed members to protect your rights.
Not sure of your membership status? Call YEU at 667 2331. They’ll send you a card if you haven’t signed yet.

Shop Steward training and recruitment:
Local Y010 has approximately 2500 members and is growing. At present we have 10 active Shop Stewards looking after your representation needs.  These dedicated Brothers and Sisters are working to ensure your rights in the workplace.  If you are interested in becoming a Shop Steward or have questions about the roles and responsibilities please contact the YEU office at 667-2331 or contact me and I will be happy to chat.  Moving into 2016 there will be new resources and training initiatives for current and new Stewards.

Social awareness:
We’re working hard to ensure social awareness and initiatives in each community.  We’re always looking for members’ ideas, input and comments on how to move our local forward. Our Local meets at 5:30pm the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the YEU Hall. Please attend a Local meeting; we need you!

Lastly, this is a bargaining year and our collective agreement is on the table.  Your Bargaining Team will be working hard to ensure your rights & make sure you are informed.  Ratification meetings will be announced and held after bargaining; be informed and be engaged. Sign up for regular bargaining update emails at http://www.yeu.ca.

Your local executive is working hard for you, we welcome your comments, concerns, and ideas.  Please contact me at rgjones@northwestel.net or call me at 867 334 4331.

In Solidarity,

rob jones

 

 

Rob Jones, President- Local Y010

It’s Summer, and that means ROAD Trip!

Dawson-Road-Trip-Scrolling-AdPSAC National Vice-President Chris Aylward and PSAC’s Regional Executive Vice-President for the North Jack Bourassa will join YEU President Steve Geick for a fairly epic summer road trip. They’ll be visiting all points between Whitehorse & Dawson, meeting Union and community members wherever they stop. There are AGM’s planned for Dawson City and a repeat engagement of the ever popular YEU Summer Bbq at the YOOP Hall.  If you’re in Dawson please stop by for a burger and a chance to talk with PSAC National leadership.

Come down and introduce yourself, find out what the union has planned for the next year and enjoy a great meal. Because really, what could be better than burgers and dogs in Dawson in June?!

Once the dogs and burgers are done and the BBQ has been stored away for another year, the intrepid union gentlemen will head up the highway, over the Top of the World and down through Beaver Creek, Destruction Bay, Burwash… you see where this is going, right? If you’re along the route, please make time to come out and say hello. We’ll let you know when to expect them in each location.

AGM’s will be held for Local Y033 (City of Dawson) and Y018 (KVA) workers on Wednesday June 24th at the YOOP Hall, so if you are a member of either of those Locals, make sure you come out the night before the bbq to your union meeting.

Convention Delegate? But I don’t even…

delegates convention 2011There has been a lot of talk about convention delegate selection lately.  Do you wonder what that means? Who can be a delegate? We asked Loralee Kesler, YEU’s Vice President and a long term union activist about the convention delegate experience.

“The first time I was nominated I was really nervous; as a first time delegate I worried I wouldn’t understand the process & wouldn’t represent my co-workers well. After convention, I felt really proud of the work that we did.  I’ve now attended 5  YEU Conventions, 2 PSAC North, 4 PSAC National conventions and 2 at CLC National.

If you’re member in good standing you can be elected  at  a meeting of your local.  You will receive a delegate information package about a month before convention to help you prepare for the sessions.  Although it’s a confidential document you can ask your local or the YEU office for clarification.  You will easily learn the rest as we go along.

There are many times that new delegates have stood on the convention floor and, with fresh eyes have made very solid suggestions for the betterment of all. I’m sometimes asked if you have to be an “activist”?  What is an activist?  Our activists come in all shapes and sizes – if you feel a kinship to what the union stands for, then you’re an activist.

Before convention we a hold training session to help new delegates understand parliamentary procedure and rules of order.  My first couple of conventions I was confused about some of the “convention speak” – once you understand it, things get easier. YEU has accepted a clear language resolution which makes a big difference!

I love conventions; we decide the direction the executive committee will take in the next term, and they are accountable to the membership at the next convention.  If someone out there is curious but unsure and their local hasn’t had delegate selection yet – I encourage them to call me with their questions.

Delegates give direction to the component for the next term; it really is a grassroots, democratic organization. This is your union, your leadership needs your direction for the term.  It’s important for locals to fill their quota so there is a fair representation of your local at the convention.  Consider this, in a local of 2000 members, do you really want only 10 delegates there representing your interests when you could have 40 delegates speaking out?”

That’s a pretty good point. If you haven’t already considered the possibilities of union involvement, maybe it’s time!