YEU is Hiring: Executive Director

Executive Director
Full-time, indeterminate (37.5 hours/week)
Salary $129,000-$152,000

Yukon Employees Union is seeking a visionary, dynamic, and driven leader to serve as our next Executive Director. The Executive Director is the sole managing director of the Yukon Employees’ Union and is responsible for the day-to-day oversight of all aspects of the operation.

Reporting to the President, the Executive Director has four key areas of accountability:

1. Labour relations services to union members;
2. Management of YEU budget and expenditures;
3. Planning, development and implementation of YEU’s strategic goals;
4. All aspects of Human Resource Management for YEU staff.

A competitive candidate will have extensive knowledge and experience in the areas of management, finance, administrative law, labour relations and conflict resolution. The level of knowledge and skill required is typically achieved through post-secondary education in business, law, labour relations, or human resources, and ten or more years’ experience in a similar leadership position. The Executive Director should have experience with collective bargaining/grievance processes and should have in-depth knowledge of the benefits and challenges associated with unionized working environments.

YEU’s Executive Director must be ethical, strategic, resilient and collaborative in order to meet the needs of nearly 5,000 members and the staff.

This challenging position is rewarded with a competitive salary, excellent pension, medical and dental plans, training opportunities and other benefits.

Applications and inquiries should be sent by e-mail with the subject line Executive  Director 2018 to:

Laura Hureau, Executive Director
lhureau@yeu.ca

Application Deadline: December 22, 2017

The Letter of Expectation: What Does it Mean?

Rob-Jones-Y010-President-2016

The fact finding meeting is over; you may never hear about the issue again, or the employer notifies you that they have come to a conclusion and you’re called for a follow up meeting.

During the meeting your supervisor reads out loud and presents a letter of expectation (LOE);  welcome to the performance management stream and the right of the employer to reaffirm the roles, responsibilities and accountability of your position within public service in Yukon.

Firstly, a letter of expectation is not discipline.  While it may feel like discipline (and trust me I know this feeling, having been through this process), it is not intended to be, nor is it a disciplinary action. 

A properly formatted letter of expectation should clearly outline the issues the employer has identified that need to be rectified, the changes they would like to see, the timeline for this change and the support and resources for assisting with process.

What happens after I receive this letter?

This is a shared responsibility; you as a public servant have been advised of your employment expectations and you should seek to meet the mark. It will feel like there is extra scrutiny on you and this is natural and actually accurate, but not in the “I’m gonna get you” way. 

After an LOE is delivered the employer is watching you, not to note your failure but to ensure your success.  It is incumbent on the employer to assist you in meeting the requirements of your position and the expectations that have been outlined. 

YTG (the employer) needs to provide access to support and resources to ensure you are successful.  Bear in mind  you are a big part of this success and it is incumbent on you to meet the requirements of your job contract with YTG. As the cliché goes it takes two to tango and for the most part you are the lead in the dance.

 How long does the LOE stay in my file?

As letters of expectation are not discipline they are not part of your file.  When it comes to your “file” you only have one and this is held at the Public Service Commission (you can make an appointment to see your file with PSC if you would like to review your public service employment file).  

Your LOE will be held by your supervisor and will not be in your “file” but will be kept for reference for the timeline provided in the letter.  An LOE will be deemed complete at your next PPP (Personal Performance Plan) provided the issues have been resolved and have not continued.  Now, if the behavior in the letter continues, this can open up the disciplinary stream (which I will cover in another post).  But we all know that this won’t be an issue……..right?

 A few other details….

 Letters of expectation do not always come from fact finding meetings. Employment behaviors can be noted and dealt with outside of fact finding meetings and delivered at the discretion of the employer.

  • Union representation is not required at the presentation of an LOE as they are not disciplinary, however, it is recommended by YTG that if it will be of benefit to the employee YEU representation can be in attendance.
  • As always, if there are questions or concerns call the YEU office at 667 2331 or call me directly at 334 4331, remembering there is a timeline for issues of approximately 20 days, so call early and get the answers.

 Yours in solidarity,

Rob Jones

rob jones

President, YEU Local Y010

 

 

Myths & Inaccuracies: An Open Letter to RYTS Manager Mike Healey

Steve Geick June 2016Mr. Healey:

Last Friday you held a press conference as part of your media blitz in response to YEU’s June 8 Risk at RYTS media release and blog post.  You expressed confusion and told the press that my worry for the safety of staff & residents is based on nothing more than “myths & inaccuracies”.

Myth:  noun| Definition: a person or thing existing only in the imagination; a popular belief that is not true.

Inaccuracy: noun| Definition: a statement that is not correct: an error or mistake

You told the press you don’t know where I got my data, and you don’t understand why I am raising the issue at this particular time when your staffing numbers are so high – you have over 120 full time staff members for the 7 Whitehorse RYTS homes, with an additional 46 AOC workers.  That’s both true and untrue.  Of the 46 AOC staff on your roster, only 23 of them have been deployed in the first months of the quarter.   It is INACCURATE to suggest that the numbers on your roster reflects the number of staff in any RYTS home on any given shift.

The data you questioned was provided to me by the Public Service Commission (your employer), when I met with them over the weeks prior to our news release.  I had many discussions with the Director and new Acting Director of Labour Relations at the PSC, both before and after they met with you to discuss the union’s concerns. It was INACCURATE to tell CBC you knew nothing of our concerns.

We became aware of the issues at RYTS over several months, as staff approached the union with grave concerns. Feeling helpless, threatened, & anxious for the well-being of their charges, many feel the needs of everyone involved are being ignored by management. Worse, they feel management has made the callous decision to value economy over safety.

Recently, more than 20 employees came to YEU for an emergency meeting; many others submitted concerns by email and phone. Most wish to remain anonymous for fear of putting their jobs or their colleagues at risk.  We have many stories from workers working alone in high risk situations with intoxicated and violent youth. Thankfully, few compensable injuries have occurred in the last year.

“Our staff and our youth are not put in unsafe situations at any time”. That’s a quote from your June 13th interview with CBC’s Sandi Coleman.

RYTS workers have catalogued a great many instances proving the exact opposite of that statement is true. I’m not sure whether to categorize your assertion as MYTH or INACCURACY, but it isn’t FACT. I’d call that statement laughable, but I’ll let you decide what you want to call it.

While your staffing stats show 46 AOC workers, you know as well as I do that it’s the House Log Books that tell the story of how frequently the homes are single-staffed. Sometimes the single-staffing is the result of an absence by an employee. If a worker calls in sick, no effort is made to fill the gap by calling in another worker. Workers are frequently required to move from one home to another mid-shift, sometimes more than once, creating instability and inconsistency for the children.

 “One night I had started a shift with two youth when I was pulled from the house to a different one in need. I had to immediately stop a game with the kids and leave. The youth left behind did not understand and were visibly upset. These are little forms of re-traumatization for youth with a history of abandonment/attachment issues.”

Workers are often scheduled to move from house to house mid-shift. This puts workers at a huge disadvantage. As one worker says, “you do not know what has gone down earlier in the day, and arrive at a house late at night where there is an intoxicated and/or violent youth with no understanding of what you are walking into”.

Mr. Healey, you mention process & procedure, including risk assessments. You say that supervisors do assessments on every scheduling situation using a comprehensive Hazard Analysis – ongoing, daily situational risk assessment.  While that may be the goal, we’d like to point out the following:

  1. Few of the staff we spoke to were even aware of these ongoing risk assessments; it seems reasonable that the staff would be consulted to assess risk, and advised of risk levels.
  2. These “daily assessments of scheduling situations” take place in the abstract. When on-the-ground realities change (a worker calls in sick, risk levels change in the home) there is no reassessment or recalibration done; additional workers are not reliably called in to keep staffing at intended levels.
  3. Only 2 of the 7 active supervisors will come in to assist when they are on call. The supervisors rotate nights on-call a week at a time. That means only 2 weeks in each 7 can staff rely on the certain availability of the on-call supervisor.
  4. If an urgent situation arises, supervisors advise calling another house for support, or calling RCMP if things get out of hand, refusing to authorize AOC hours.

Suggesting unsupported workers leave another house under-staffed or call the RCMP is an abandonment of responsibility. RYTS staff do everything possible to avoid calling the police. They know the RYTS home is often the child’s last chance before youth detention.

Mr. Healey, when you and I exchanged emails a couple of weeks ago, I asked for 6 months of minutes for the joint Health & Safety Committee meetings. These meetings are meant to be held with management and staff representatives.  Based on the minutes sent to me by your assistant, only 4 Health & Safety Committee meetings have been held in the last 9 months. That does not illustrate a meaningful commitment to safety in the workplace. I bring it up because you mentioned on air that these meetings are an important part of your safety process. Myth?

Rather than consider how to ensure staff and the children in their care feel supported, you have “invited” them all to attend meetings with yourself and ADM Brenda-Lee Doyle.

Your words: “The intent of these upcoming meetings is to listen to your concerns and ensure you have an understanding of the processes and factors that pertain to lower staffing levels. Although this is never ideal, I want to assure you that during times when the human resources are difficult to balance, your health and safety is our priority.” 

I translate that as “We will listen to your concerns then make sure you understand why they don’t matter. Sucks but hey, we’re here for you.”   By your own admission and in direct conflict with your public statements, your email recognizes that RYTS homes currently face lower staffing levels, and you are concerned for their safety.

So please clarify, Mr. Healey; were your comments MYTHS or INACCURACIES?  I’ll let you decide.

Steve Geick, President

Yukon Employees’ Union

Greetings from YEU Local Y010 President Rob Jones

Greetings Brothers & Sisters, Friends & Colleagues.exec-adjusted

It is a great honour for me to be able to write to you as the new President of Local Y010. I am humbled to have been nominated and trusted to continue the great work of our past President and Executive.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Sister Tammi Sikorski for all her hard work, sacrifice and dedication to the local. This was greatly appreciated and I clearly have a high standard to meet in keeping up with Tammi’s leadership over these past few years.  Thank you Tammi, we owe you more than we can ever possibly convey.

I would also like to thank Brother Richard Wagner for his work and representation for the Local and YEU as a whole as our Chief Shop Steward.  His knowledge, mentorship and representation were greatly appreciated.

We also say goodbye to Sisters Kat Traplin and Yoshiko Atkins, their voice, experience and dedication to the Local were greatly appreciated and will be missed. Thank you for your service. We wish you all the best in the future.

Please allow me to introduce your Local Y010 Executive:

President: Rob Jones
Chief Shop Steward: Paul Davis
Assistant Chief Shop Steward: Laurie Tamminen
Secretary / Treasurer: Denise Berken
Directors:  Duane Purych, Khusru Zaman, Aziz Mollah
Kathy Donnelly, Amber Harder and Danielle Swift.

We have two Director vacancies. If you are interested in being an active voice in your Local please contact me to discuss the roles and responsibilities of a Local Director.

Over the next year local Y010 has an ambitious agenda including:
Y010 new logo 2014
Signing off all RAND members:
A RAND is a worker in the union environment who has not filled out a union card; presently Y010 has some RANDs.  As a RAND your union dues are being deducted, however you do not have all the benefits of full membership.  We will be working in the community and workplaces to ensue our members are converted from RAND to fully signed members to protect your rights.
Not sure of your membership status? Call YEU at 667 2331. They’ll send you a card if you haven’t signed yet.

Shop Steward training and recruitment:
Local Y010 has approximately 2500 members and is growing. At present we have 10 active Shop Stewards looking after your representation needs.  These dedicated Brothers and Sisters are working to ensure your rights in the workplace.  If you are interested in becoming a Shop Steward or have questions about the roles and responsibilities please contact the YEU office at 667-2331 or contact me and I will be happy to chat.  Moving into 2016 there will be new resources and training initiatives for current and new Stewards.

Social awareness:
We’re working hard to ensure social awareness and initiatives in each community.  We’re always looking for members’ ideas, input and comments on how to move our local forward. Our Local meets at 5:30pm the 2nd Tuesday of each month in the YEU Hall. Please attend a Local meeting; we need you!

Lastly, this is a bargaining year and our collective agreement is on the table.  Your Bargaining Team will be working hard to ensure your rights & make sure you are informed.  Ratification meetings will be announced and held after bargaining; be informed and be engaged. Sign up for regular bargaining update emails at http://www.yeu.ca.

Your local executive is working hard for you, we welcome your comments, concerns, and ideas.  Please contact me at rgjones@northwestel.net or call me at 867 334 4331.

In Solidarity,

rob jones

 

 

Rob Jones, President- Local Y010

HOT New Home Heating Fuel DISCOUNT for YEU/PSAC Members!

Heat truck isolatedYEU is very excited to announce that we have negotiated a heating fuel discount of 3 cents/litre off Heat Yukon’s fuel delivery market rate for our members! The discount will apply whether you choose auto-fill or on-call service.  Heat Yukon is proud to offer contract free delivery; you’re never locked in to service, there is no cancellation penalty and they offer flexible payment options including email money transfers.

Launched in August of 2014, the 100% Yukon owned heating fuel supply company has really taken off. With a focus on terrific service, flexible options and great pricing, Heat Yukon has quickly established a terrific reputation and a broad customer base.

The small group of partners are very proud of their 100% Yukon owned status; even the supplier of the fuel they deliver is wholly Yukon owned. With a staff of 5 and growing, managing partner Douma Alwarid and her team are excited about the future. The goal is to provide customer service unparalleled in the Yukon.  Douma says “fuel is fuel… anyone can deliver fuel. We want this to be a good experience for our customers”.

With the purchase of another fuel delivery truck and service partners in *almost every Yukon community, they are poised to make that happen.

If you choose the auto-fill option, Douma tells us the savings are most pronounced. There is an automatic 4 cent/litre reduction off market rate for those on auto-fill, and the additional 3 cent/ litre discount makes for a pretty great deal.  The average Whitehorse home uses about 3000 litres of fuel per year, so over a long cold winter the savings could really add up.

Here’s how to get the YEU/PSAC member discount:  Logo HeatYukon-md-all

1.  You’ll need to provide your YEU/PSAC Member Number; it’s on your membership card. Don’t have one? Call our office or email contact@yeu.ca to request a new card. Our staff will provide you a “Member in good standing” letter to use while you wait for your new card.

2.  Visit http://www.heatyukon.com, call Heat Yukon at 633-3322 OR email sales@heatyukon.com and decide which service suits you best. Not sure you want to commit? Try their on-call service and decide. No pressure. As Douma says, Heat it UP!

At YEU, we’re always looking for ways to improve life for our members.  To learn about OTHER YEU member benefits, visit http://bit.ly/YEUMemberBenefits

*not yet available in Dawson (sorry!)

Whitehorse Food Bank Feels the Summer Heat

no-soup-july-2015Every summer the Whitehorse Food Bank faces the same challenge; how to meet increased demand at the same time  both food and cash donations dry up. Families with kids at home struggle to make sure there’s enough food to fill hungry bellies and visitors to the city turn to the Food Bank to help them make it through the summer.

New Executive Director Kyla Merkel has instituted some wonderful new initiatives including Family Day at the emergency food provider. All summer, each Wednesday will be reserved for families with children. At that time, only parents & kids will be allowed in the building. While the adults pick up their once monthly food hamper, children will be able to colour, play with toys and have a healthy snack.

With health in mind, the Food Bank has removed ramen and instant soups from their most requested list. Remember, If you make a food donation be sure to bring your grocery receipt when you drop off food; you will be sent a tax receipt at the end of the year… everyone wins!

How can you help?

Donate money!  Sign up for the Food Bank’s Green Apple Club! Visit www.whitehorsefoodbank.ca and register for easy donations monthly. Even $10/month will help ensure reliable cash flow. You can also donate online at Canada Helps or donate your recycling at Raven; just tell the clerk you’d like your refund donated to the Whitehorse Food Bank.

Donate food! Top items include pasta, canned soup, tinned fruit and vegetables, canned meat, dry cereal, rice & peanut butter. Visit the Donate Food page to learn more.

no-peanut-butter-july-2015

Strike Vote, Recession & the 9 Day Fortnight.

yg-hours-cut-aug-6-1982-star Yukon’s economy was in free fall in 1982. The hard rock mining industry had collapsed, mines were shuttered and the territory slid into recession. Hundreds were out of work and recovery looked bleak.  It was against that evolving backdrop that the negotiating team of the YTPSA met with  the Yukon Territorial Government in early 1982.

Still battling wage disparity and the high cost of living in the north, YTPSA opened salary negotiations with an 18% pay raise demand. This was met with a resounding NO by the government who offered 13.5% and no more.  The union and employer battled it out at the table but reached impasse when the government’s offer was rejected by the union. Internal conflict within the Union saw the resignation of 2 of 3 YTPSA bargaining team members.

In May of 1982, Government leader Chris Pearson withdrew the salary offer and chided the union for its attempt to “insulate public servants from the economic environment which provides their livelihood”.

Following the decision of a conciliation board, the Union recommended ratification of a contract containing an increase of 10.2%. A territory wide ratification tour followed, and the ballot boxes returned to Whitehorse to be counted. But while the union was getting the contract ratified, the politicians refused to accept the conciliator’s recommendations. No deal.

YTPSA didn’t bother opening the ballot boxes. Instead, they grabbed new ballot boxes  and hit the road again. This time though, they were looking for a strike mandate; they got it – over 80% of the membership voted in favour of a strike.
yg-hours-cut-aug-6-1982-star-part-2
When they returned to Whitehorse, strike vote in hand, both sides met again at the bargaining table. This time they agreed on a 10% raise  and the deal was signed.

Meanwhile, the economic realities of a territory without a hard rock mining industry could not be ignored.  Soon after the contract was signed, the landscape shifted again.

Government leader Chris Pearson rose in the legislature to say “Mr. Speaker, Honourable Members, the current economic recession is having an impact on Yukon and its people far beyond anything that could have been foreseen six months ago.

The closure of the United Keno Hill mine at Elsa in combination with the closures already announced at Whitehorse Copper and Cyprus Anvil constitute a disaster to the Yukon economy as well as to the mining personnel themselves and their immediate communities. It will be no surprise, therefore, that the Government of Yukon has found it necessary to undertake a program of retrenchment in order to bring our spending plans in line with the financial resources available”.

On August 6, 1982 Pearson announced that the Yukon’s Public Service Union had agreed to the government’s proposal, cutting civil servant’s working hours by 10% as a cost-cutting measure. This cut would be in effect until March 31,‘83 and could save the government $2 million.

Pearson’s “9 day fortnight” program was clever; the pay increase was cancelled out by the reduction in hours worked. YG’s Main Administration building and other administrative offices shut down every second Friday. Thus, most employees’ pay cheques remained unchanged while they enjoyed a long weekend every other week. The union faced little choice; cut backs or lay offs, the government needed to cut costs.

Our thanks to the Yukon Archives for Whitehorse Star records and to past President Dave Hobbis for his recollections of this interesting period in YEU’s history.